Amphetamines Addiction

People who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder sometimes require amphetamines to help them cope. Some people take amphetamines to treat narcolepsy, a sleep disorder. Amphetamines are a type of stimulant, a drug that can cause addiction. Dextroamphetamine and methamphetamine are two other types of amphetamines.

Amphetamines are sometimes sold illegally on the street. Both prescribed and street amphetamines can be abused. The most commonly abused amphetamine is methamphetamine. Amphetamine dependence occurs when you need the drug to function normally. If you are dependent, you will experience symptoms of withdrawal if you stop using the drug abruptly.

If you are dependent on amphetamine, you may:
  • miss work or school
  • not complete tasks or perform tasks as well
  • not care about physical appearance
  • have poor hygiene
  • not eat
  • lose a lot of weight
  • have severe dental problems
  • steal to get money to support your drug habit
  • try to hide your amphetamine abuse from others
  • use amphetamines when you are alone
  • not be able to stop using amphetamines
  • make excuses to yourself and others to use amphetamines
  • experience withdrawal symptoms if you do not use amphetamines
  • have episodes of violence and mood disturbances
  • have anxiety
  • have insomnia
  • feel confused
  • be paranoid
  • have visual or auditory hallucinations (seeing or hearing things)

You may find it easier to go through amphetamine withdrawal in a hospital setting if you experience strong drug cravings. It may also help if you have negative mood changes, including aggression and suicidal behavior.

Individual counseling, family therapy, and group therapy can help you:
  • identify why you use drugs
  • resolve problems that led you to use drugs
  • repair relationships with your family
  • learn ways to avoid amphetamine use
  • find activities that you enjoy besides drug use
  • get support from others who have been amphetamine.

Your doctor may prescribe medication to ease severe symptoms of withdrawal. People who have severe intravenous amphetamine dependence may be prescribed methylphenidate. Fluoxetine may decrease your cravings. Imipramine may help you stick with your treatment for amphetamine dependence. Your doctor may prescribe other medications to help relieve symptoms of anxiety, depression, and aggression.

Sources

  • Get In Touch

    • Achrafieh,
      St. George Hospital Street
    • Tel/Fax: +961 1 583583
    • Email: idraac@idraac.org
  • subscribe to our newsletter

    Sign up to our mailing list, to receive updates on IDRAAC's activities and more.
      Submit

    Register For Alert

    Sign up and select the subjects of interest and get updated periodically.
Copyright © 2019 IDRAAC All rights reserved.